D20 Rockets to New High As BYD, 4 Other Stocks Gain More Than 10 Percent

The Driverless Transportation Weekly Stock Index (D20) exploded skyward, up 14.15 points to a new all-time high of 240.33 this week, led by Chinese automaker BYD.

Eighteen price gainers blitzed two price losers to push the D20 up 6.3 percent, the third-largest positive move ever for the D20. Five D20 stocks had price increases of more than 10 percent.

With the Chinese Government considering a ban on vehicles that use gas, Chinese electric vehicles maker BYD (BYDDY) saw its stock price leap a whopping D20 20.3 percent to close at $14.43 — the largest jump for any stock in a single week in D20 history.

The other four 10-percent-plus price gainers were D20 newcomer Autoliv (ALV) at 14 percent, Japanese-based Renesas Electronics (TYO:6723) at 12.7 percent, Tesla (TLSA) at 10.6 percent, and NVIDIA (NVDA) at 10 percent.

Neither the Dow nor the S&P 500 could hold a candle to the D20’s explosive rise. The Dow gained 2.2 percent to close at 22268.34 while the S&P 500 added 1.6 percent to rise just above 2500 and end the week at 2500.23.

Visit the Driverless Transportation D20 Stock Index page to learn more about it and its component stocks.

Up-and-Comers:

Samsung’s first investment from its new Automotive Innovation Fund was a €75 million investment in TTTech. Among other products, TTTech designs and manufactures advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). In the past, TTTech has partnered with Audi, a division of Volkswagen (VLKPY) and Renesas Electronics Corp. (TYO:6723), both members of the D20.

Driverless vehicle start-up Zoox is searching for additional investments. Menlo Park-based Zoox raised money from Draper Fisher Jurvetson, Lux Capital and others based on a $1.5-billion valuation. Rumors are that Japan’s Softbank is interested in investing. Zoox has been very secretive about product plans and strategies.

NVIDIA Loss Leads to D20 Drop

Even though price gainers outnumbered price losers 11 to nine, a 4-percent drop by NVIDIA (NVDA) led to an overall drop for the Driverless Transportation Weekly Stock Index (D20) this week.

The D20 stepped back from an all-time high after three consecutive weeks of gains by losing 0.2 percent of its value, closing at 226.18. The Dow and S&P 500 followed suit by losing ground as well. The Dow lost 0.9 percent and the S&P 500 gave back 0.6 percent to close at 2461.43.

NVIDIA’s 4-percent share price drop was the primary reason the D20 lost ground this week.  Now at 23.7 percent of the D20’s total value due to its 560-percent rise over the past 18 months, NVIDIA lost $6.77 per share and closed at $163.69 this week.  Even small movements in NVIDIA’s share price seem to move the D20 value considerably.

Daimler AG (DDAIF), the parent of Mercedes-Benz, was the D20’s price percentage gain leader this week. Its share price jumped 6.1 percent as rumors swirled that it is considering a structural organization change that would separate its truck and bus unit.

Visit the Driverless Transportation D20 Stock Index page to learn more about it and its component stocks.

Up-and-Comers:

LiDAR maker Innoviz has secured a $65-million Series B investment, led by D20 components Delphi Automotive (DLPH) and Magna International (MGA). The money will reportedly be used to prepare for large-scale production planned for 2019.  Innoviz’s LiDAR designs use solid-state components and no moving parts, which should make their systems less costly and more reliable than current systems on the market from companies like Velodyne.

Lyft and Drive.ai have teamed up for a pilot of self-driving cars in San Francisco. Founded in 2015, Drive.ai is a Bay Area-based developer of artificial intelligence software for driverless vehicles that uses deep learning algorithms.

D20 Hits New High With Volvo AB as it Welcomes Autoliv to the Index

It was a banner week for the Driverless Transportation Weekly Stock Index (D20), which hit a new all-time high thanks to gainers like Volvo AB, while also welcoming a new stock into the mix.

This week the D20 welcomed Autoliv (NYSE:ALV) to the index. Autoliv replaces Mobileye (MBLY), which announced its purchase by Intel (INTC) on March 13, 2017 and completed the transaction in August.

Autoliv has 2016 revenues of $10 billion from the sale of passive and active automotive safety systems including components and systems required for driverless operation.  Autoliv (ALV) marked its debut in the D20 by adding 3 percent to its value as its stock price jumped from $106.07 to $109.27 a share.

The D20 overall ended the week at a new all-time high by rising 2.1 percent and closing at 226.56. Its third consecutive “up” week also beat the Dow, which managed a 0.8-percent gain, and the S&P 500, which climbed 1.4 percent to close at 2476.55.

D20’s leading price percentage gainer was the Swedish truck and heavy equipment manufacturer, Volvo AB (STO:VOLV-B). Its price jumped 6.7 percent to close at 145.60 SEK on news that its cost-cutting efforts and construction equipment sales growth drove a 58 percent surge in its first quarter earnings.

Visit the Driverless Transportation D20 Stock Index page to learn more about it and its component stocks.

Up-and-Comers:

Grab, Uber’s main rival in Southeast Asia, has announced that it has taken an investment from Toyota for an undisclosed amount. The investment comes from Toyota Tsusho, Toyota’s general trading company. There is a second element to the transaction in which Grab will share driving pattern data for 100 Toyota cars in Grab’s fleet that is collected by Toyota’s driving recorder, Translog. The large international automotive brands all seem to be buying into the ride-sharing industry. First, General Motors invested in Lyft. Volvo and Daimler Benz have partnered with Uber, and before Toyota’s investment, Honda had also invested in Grab.

15 Gainers Help D20 Rise, Autoliv Replaces Mobileye

Fifteen price gainers ensured the Driverless Transportation Weekly Stock Index (D20) would rise for the second straight week, while we prepare for Autoliv to join the index.

The D20 added 2.53 points to close at 221.82 for a 1.2-percent gain. It doubled up the Dow, which gained 0.6 percent to finish the week at 21,812.67, and also beat the S&P 500, which rose 0.7 percent.

Leading price percentage gainers Blackberry (BBRY) and Magna International (MGA) each added 3.6 percent to their stock prices this week.

With Intel completing its acquisition of Mobileye (MBLY) soon, the D20 will be deciding upon a new stock to replace it in the index.

Mobileye was a pure play in the driverless field, as its only products were driverless or assisted driving systems. One consideration was to replace it with Intel (INTC), who is buying Mobileye. But this would make the D20 act more like the big indexes, as Intel is a member of both the Dow and S&P500.

Another thought was to replace them with another auto manufacturer like Toyota (NYSE:TM), but with six car companies already, the D20 is over-represented with automobile manufacturers.

In the end, we at DriverlessTransportation.com decided AutoLiv will replace Mobileye in the D20.

Autoliv is a global firm headquartered in Sweden and traded on the NYSE. There is large enough volume of trades to make their stock active enough to add to the D20. Their products are automotive safety-related. They have two divisions–passive safety, which manufactures airbags, seatbelts and steering wheels, and active safety, which designs and delivers collision avoidance, radar and vision systems.

Autoliv recently formed a joint venture with Volvo called Zenuity to sell driverless cars based on NVIDIA’s Drive PX platform.

Visit the Driverless Transportation D20 Stock Index page to learn more about it and its component stocks.

Up-and-Comers:

Cubic Telecom, a Dublin, Ireland startup, announced that is has raised $46.5 million in a Series C venture round to increase the size of its engineering team. Cubic’s software solution enables car manufacturers to build cars with common “connected” hardware and be able to sell them in countries with different “connected” protocols and service providers. Audi and Qualcomm were investors in this round.

Tesla’s Tumultuous 2nd Quarter Tops D20, and Finally Some Positive News for Uber

An announcement from Tesla (TLSA) that it exceeded analysts’ estimates for second quarter revenue and earnings drove its stock price up 6 percent this week. That increase helped the Driverless Transportation Weekly Stock Index (D20) eke out a 0.4-percent gain, even though price losers outnumbered gainers 12 to eight.

The D20 was outpaced by the Dow, which jumped 1.2 percent, but doubled up the S&P 500, which only gained 0.2 percent.

Tesla’s second quarter revenue was $2.79 billion with a non-GAAP earnings per share (EPS) loss of $1.73, which beat the consensus estimates of $2.52 billion in revenue and an EPS loss of $1.88. The Tesla stock price rose from $335.07 to close the week at $356.91 per share.

Tesla’s futures are heavily hedged on the success of its Model 3 launch and early production figures. Tesla is betting that a reasonably priced but stylish, fully electric vehicle will get its sales volumes high enough so that it can start covering its administrative overhead and turn those EPS losses into gains.

Visit the Driverless Transportation D20 Stock Index page to learn more about it and its component stocks.

 

Up-and-Comers:

There is finally some good news for the beleaguered Uber, from its freight division. Uber Freight announced that it is adding new markets in California, Arizona, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and the Chicago-Midwest Region. It also announced that it has added personalized load-matching, which takes into account what types of loads a driver prefers and whether the route is local, short haul or long haul.

News Roundup: India Says ‘No’ to Self-Driving Cars, Two Companies Plan Cross-Border Road Test for Driverless Cars, and More

Jennifer van der Kleut

A roundup of recent headlines to come out of the driverless and connected-car industries this past week:

India says No to driverless cars over fear of job losses

India’s transport minister, Nitin Gadkari, told news outlets this past week that driverless cars will not be allowed in India anytime soon, due to the number of job losses it could lead to. Gadkari said India’s unemployment rate is still too high to risk losing jobs to automated vehicles. As it is currently, he said the country is in need of at least 100,000 more commercial drivers and he looks forward to being able to provide the Indian people with so many available jobs. In addition, India officials estimate that the amount of infrastructure changes that would be needed to prepare India for self-driving cars would be far too expensive given the nation’s current economy. Gadkari did say he would not rule out the technology altogether in the future if India’s situation improves. Read more from BBC News.

 

Manhattan proposal wants to transform cross-island highways into roads exclusively for driverless vehicles

Manhattan-based architecture firm Edg has proposed a bold project that they say would reduce urban pollution and congestion in Manhattan and make some major roadways on the island exclusive to driverless cars. The proposal, called “Loop NYC,” wants to take major roadways that cut across the island–namely, 14th, 23rd, 34th, 42nd, 57th, 86th and 110th streets–and turn them into roads that are exclusive to driverless cars. Edg says this could cut down traffic time from the current 40 minutes it takes to drive a loop from Grand Central Station to Lower Manhattan and back down to just 11 minutes, with traffic flowing more smoothly thanks to self-driving vehicles. In addition, Loop NYC wants to create enormous green spaces and pedestrian bridges that would cross over the driverless roadways and would be exclusive to pedestrians and bicyclists, improving beauty while reducing pollution, as well as increasing the city’s walkability. As expected, the proposal is still “largely speculative” in nature, particularly given the fact that the federal government still has not approved a nationwide set of laws and regulations for driverless cars. Read more about Loop NYC on ArchDaily.

 

Two companies plan road test for driverless cars across the border from the U.S. into Canada

Two major companies working on driverless vehicle technology, Continental and Magna, are teaming up for a whopper of a road test. The two companies plan to send self-driving cars across the border from Michigan into Sarnia, in Toronto, Canada. The cars will reportedly cross the border at two locations–through the tunnel from Detroit into Windsor, and crossing the Blue Water Bridge into Sarnia. Reps say the cars’ “driverless mode” will be enabled whenever possible but will likely include a few instances when the driver will take over control. They add, crossing an international border makes for incredibly unique driving conditions, which will allow Continental and Magna to collect a lot of valuable data from the cars’ cameras, LiDAR and radar. In addition, the test will reveal future hurdles when it comes to crossing the borders of two different countries with two different sets of laws and regulations. Read more from TechCrunch.

Image: Loop NYC rendering by Edg

Despite Big Jump by Denso, D20 Takes a Small Dip

Despite a big jump for Japanese auto parts maker Denso, the Driverless Transportation Weekly Stock Index (D20) took a small dip this past week, after enjoying three straight weeks of gains, rising 12 out of the past 14 weeks.

The D20 lost 2.85 points, or 1.3 percent, losing ground against the Dow, which gained 1.2 percent, and the S&P 500, which remained virtually unchanged.

The only D20 stock that moved significantly this week was Denso (DNZOY), which jumped 7.6 percent to close at $23.18 on rumors that when it reports quarterly earnings on Aug. 4, they will be above expectations.

Visit the Driverless Transportation D20 Stock Index page to learn more about it and its component stocks.

Up-and-Comers:

Here, the mapping company jointly owned  by Daimler, Audi, and BMW, is launching a real-time traffic service that pulls data from its joint owners’ vehicles. Here, which started as a division of phone maker Nokia, was spun out and sold to a joint venture of the three German automakers. 

Momenta, a Chinese-based new entrant to the driverless car software market, recently raised $46 million in a series B venture funding. One of the funders was Daimler, which seems to have accelerated its driverless efforts recently.

Legal Victory for Renesas Leads D20 Stock Index to Gain

A legal victory for Renesas Electronics led the way as 11 propelled the Driverless Transportation Weekly Stock (D20) up this past week.

The D20 gained 1.64 points to close at 224.97, beating the Dow, which lost 0.3 percent, and the S&P 500, which rose 0.5 percent and closed the week at 2472.54.

Renesas Electronics Corp. (TSE:6723) gained 7.6 percent to close at ¥1090 per share.  Renesas announced that it won a patent infringement lawsuit brought by Zond LLC, and that it has developed a kit for its R-Car system that supports cocoro SB’s “Emotion Engine.”

Visit the Driverless Transportation D20 Stock Index page to learn more about it and its component stocks.

Up-and-Comers:

Lyft is launching a driverless division.  It announced that it just signed a lease for a large facility in Palo Alto and expects to hire hundreds of people to fill it. Lyft will continue to work with its major investor, General Motors and partners Waymo, JLR and Nutonomy.

Driverless truck startup, Embark, has raised $15 million in an initial round of funding. Its funding announcement coincides with an announcement of a partnership with heavy truck manufacturer, Peterbilt.  Embark has prototyped its neural, net-based deep learning approach on a Peterbilt 579 Truck.

Led by NVIDIA, D20 Leaps to Record High

In a nearly across the board sweep, nineteen price gainers and one unchanged stock drove the D20 to new heights this week.  The D20 jumped 5.2 percent, closing at a record high of 223.51.  The D20 easily outpaced the Dow, which gained 1 percent and the S&P 500 which added 1.4 percent and closed at 2459.27.

As the D20’s leading price percentage gainer this week, NVIDIA (NVDA) continues to hit new records and stun the market with its meteoric price rise.  Its partnership with Baidu continues to enchant the market causing its price to rise 12.4 percent this week and closing at $164.95 per share.  Because of its staggering share price run, gaining 625 percent since August 2015, NVIDIA is now 24% of the total value of the D20.  This week’s 12.4 percent gain accounted for the more than half of the D20’s 5.2 percent increase.

The lone non-gainer of the week was Nissan (NSANY).  It remained unchanged at $20.23 per share.

Visit the Driverless Transportation D20 Stock Index page to learn more about it and its component stocks.

Up and Comers:

Cortica, founded in Israel, is building AI systems based on analysis of how human and animal cortical networks process natural stimuli.   Cortica is now applying those AI methods to “teach” autonomous vehicles with unsupervised learning.

News Roundup: Congress Wants to Bar States From Preempting Federal Driverless Laws, Dutch Startup Amber Generates Big Buzz with Self-Driving Cars, and More

Jennifer van der Kleut

Here is our roundup of headlines to come out of the driverless vehicle industry this week.

Dutch startup Amber making waves with self-driving cars

Quite a buzz is forming around Dutch mobility startup Amber. The company has positioned itself as strong competition for larger firms like Tesla Motors, Uber, Google’s Waymo and others by announcing plans to add self-driving cars to its on-demand ride service in the Netherlands by mid-2018. Amber was originally the brainchild of students at the Eindhoven University of Technology, which is known for its advanced automotive curriculum. Amber is partnering with five different software companies and research institutes, including Nvidia and Microsoft, that have already developed self-driving software. Automotive consultancy firm Roland Berger recently ranked The Netherlands at the top of its Automotive Disruption Radar. Read more from VentureBeat.

 

Spokesperson: U.S. Congress may introduce bills this week that will bar states from preempting federal driverless laws

A spokesperson for the U.S. House of Representatives’ Energy and Commerce Subcommittee said members expect driverless vehicle legislation to be introduced as soon as this week. The legislation could then begin debate on the House floor by next week. Rumors suggest one of the biggest provisions of the legislation would bar individual states from setting their own regulations for driverless vehicles that would preempt federal regulations, and would prevent the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration from pre-approving self-driving car technologies. It is also believed the legislation will allow for up to 100,000 vehicles per year per manufacturer to be exempt from from federal motor vehicle safety rules that prevent the sale of self-driving vehicles without human controls. Several auto manufacturers that are working on driverless technology, such as Tesla, Google and General Motors, have long been lobbying Congress to preempt state regulations that they feel limit the progress of the technology, particularly in California. Read more from NewsMax.

 

International survey names Tesla, Waymo, Bosch among ‘most investible’ companies in driverless race

International law firm Gowling WLG and economic research agency Explain the Market conducted a year-long survey of investors, asking them which companies they felt the most confidence investing in when it comes to autonomous vehicle technology. Auto manufacturers Tesla Motors (26%) and BMW (22%) earned the most investors’ votes in their category. Google’s Waymo won the IT firm category by a landslide with 36% of votes. The next closest company in the IT category was Apple with 11%. Among tech brands, Bosch left many others in the dust, earning 54% of investors’ votes. Read more from Information Age.

Image: Amber self-driving car, courtesy of Amber